Icicles – It was a Good Day

The largest man-made icicle was 36’4.5″ (11.1 m) long and weighed 26 tons. These were only ~6″ and located about 3 meters from the sidewalk which made this shot very difficult. There’s something so dynamic about an icicle forged by transitioning a compounds matter between two states as a result of cold, then heat and cold again. Clear, sharp, frozen solid in motion, yet fragile and temporary in nature. I took maybe 30 shots and just couldn’t get the angle or focus right. Here’s a few pics I took near Kee’s Chocolates in SOHO:

365Project

Ice Cube – ‘It Was A Good Day’

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

A powdery snow blankets the “Merchant Princes” of NYC

Out come the Timberlands. It’s the first snow day in NY. Leaving early in the morning, I took a tour around the Village, Time Square and Bryant Park in the snow. It’s supposed to drop over a foot and that seems to be an underestimate. I haven’t seen snow like this in the city ever and can only imagine powder that’s dropping in the mountains upstate and in Vermont. If there ever were a time I’d want to board on the east coast, now would be it.

I took this shot in Bryant Park of the Reading Library. At the head of the library is a statue of William Earle Dodge considered at one time to be a Merchant Prince of Wall Street. William was a noted abolitionist, Native American rights activist, congressman, founding member of the YMCA, mining baron. A considerable resume for a NY Republican of the times; despite his Civil War profiteering (southerners labeled him a carpetbagger) but deserving of the bronze in the park honoring his support of the Native Americans, lobbying for the prosecution of the U.S. cavalry commanders who massacred Blackfeet Indians in Montana and campaigning for the creation of what would be come the Department of Interior.

365Project

Crookers – Remedy (Feat. Miike Snow)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Rocco Ristorante

Italian food and culture is rooted everywhere in New York. Rocco Ristorante is one such traditional Italian joint, operating in the Greenwich Village since 1922 that not only has years of history still worn on their unchanged walls but was also a starter kitchen for the Mario Batali. An establishment of this age and character usually caters to die-hard regulars, neighborhood locals and a few well-researched tourists as a walk by doesn’t sell the uninitiated on the traditional style. Fortunately the family style decor and friendly service are still as much a priority as the quality southern Italian food typical 90 years ago today.

Legend has it Anthony “Tony Bender” Strollo operator of several illegal gambling parlors and nightclubs in Greenwich, ordered a hit here back in 1952. While dining in old restaurants such as this in New York, you can’t help wonder what illicit activities and patrons frequented their front and backrooms. Dean Martin and the Rat Pack crew may have graced Rocco’s doors, taken a card game in their backroom or indulged in a traditional meal at the very table you’re eating your Penne Arrabiata and Veal Piccata.

“Nel blu dipinto di blu” (“In the Blue Painted Blue”), popularly known as “Volare” (Italian for the infinitive form of the verb “to fly”) was originally sung by Domenico Modugno, and is the only non-English language song that has reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 charts in America. Modugno became the first Grammy winner for the Grammy Award for Record of the Year and Grammy Award for Song of the Year in 1958 for this recording. Here’s Dean Martin’s version, probably sung in one of Tony’s clubs in the Village.

Dean Martin – Volare (Nel blu dipinto di blu)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

photo365_2010_039